Spectacular Measures! The Hausman-Hill Assortment

The company of Disston & Morss developed this elaborately adorned and gold-plated measuring instrument as

The company of Disston & Morss developed this elaborately adorned and gold-plated measuring instrument as a “show piece” for their exhibit at the 1876 United States Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Mixture square, stage and protractor by [Henry] Disston & [Joab] Morss, Philadelphia, 1876. Brass, steel, gold plating.

By James D Balestrieri

DOYLESTOWN, PENN. – “Magnificent Steps! The Hausman-Hill Collection of Calculating Devices,” the new exhibition at the Mercer Museum, invites discussion of the astonishing matters men and women obtain and of the shocking number of individuals who acquire them. To your humble correspondent, at any charge, collecting early measuring devices does not appear to be notably strange or one of a kind. Take into account the history of collector Jim Hill, who, as the exhibition product states, “discovered an early really like of science and mathematics, which influenced an fascination in calculating products.”

Hill not only gathered what he cherished but what he went on to do. The exhibition material goes on, “These objects, it seemed to him, were being much more than simply tools or mechanical artifacts. To Hill, they were ‘significant, physical manifestations of how Math and Science have lengthy been utilized to day-to-day existence.’ Afterwards, Hill’s skilled occupation as a machinist, metalsmith, woodworker, restorer and personalized manufacturer before long grew to become intertwined with his accumulating pursuits.”

So collecting calculating products may perhaps not be abnormal. But what is genuine is that we get measurement and the equipment we use in measurement for granted. They are component and parcel of almost everything we do, from pumping fuel to mixing pancake batter. Market would not exist – in truth, it could not exist – without having conventional measurements and instruments to determine individuals measurements.

Left, the “Adjust-o-matic” dress form by Luigi Cella (inventor), American, circa 1960s. Cellulose and metal. Right, adjustable tailor’s patterns by John B Plant, Manchester, N.H., circa 1910. Wood, cardboard, metal, fabric and paper. Photo Kevin Crawford Imagery LLC.

Remaining, the “Adjust-o-matic” dress type by Luigi Cella (inventor), American, circa 1960s. Cellulose and metal. Proper, adjustable tailor’s styles by John B Plant, Manchester, N.H., circa 1910. Wooden, cardboard, metallic, cloth and paper. Photo Kevin Crawford Imagery LLC.

Instruments are how we implement math and science to life. They embody the simple purposes that ascertain the angle of a roof, the length of a hem, the boundary of a parcel of land, or of a nation, our posture on land and sea, the way we journey in – or the path we should to travel in – down to the essential I am at present pressing to make the letters that make the words and phrases on this web page.

Permit me give you a new instance of an incident in which faulty measurement led to disaster. Forgive me if you know this tale, but in 1998 the Mars Climate Orbiter both flamed out in the Martian ambiance or spun out of orbit and is now a smaller section of the solar system. Why? Following an investigation, NASA’s program, calibrated in metric models, did not jive with the Lockheed-Martin spacecraft’s English (or imperial) measurements. The centimeter and the inch – like oil and, effectively, some other form of oil. Final result: $327,000,000 later – no Orbiter. All for the reason that of a failure to choose on a standard and make measurements primarily based on that regular.

Let’s flip the calendar – nevertheless one more, at times contentious instrument of measurement – again to the Eighteenth and early Nineteenth Century devices, equipment, tools, in the Hausman-Hill Collection.

Anthony Lamb cast this particular compass from reclaimed or “recycled” brass scrap, for which he offered “ready money” in a 1745 advertisement. The compass face is hand-engraved, displaying the four quadrants, 0 to 90 degrees. Surveyor’s compass by Anthony Lamb (1703-1784), New York City, circa 1735. Brass, glass, steel. Photo Kevin Crawford Imagery LLC.

Anthony Lamb cast this particular compass from reclaimed or “recycled” brass scrap, for which he provided “ready money” in a 1745 advertisement. The compass deal with is hand-engraved, exhibiting the 4 quadrants, to 90 degrees. Surveyor’s compass by Anthony Lamb (1703-1784), New York City, circa 1735. Brass, glass, steel. Photograph Kevin Crawford Imagery LLC.

Here’s the paradox: in purchase to facilitate the Industrial Revolution, devices experienced to be produced of interchangeable sections in purchase to conduct repeatable tasks. Devices experienced to be made to aid execute this. Nonetheless, and this is the tricky portion, there were being no devices to make these instruments and, until eventually the prevalent adoption of the English program of measurement and the introduction of the metric process, no generally acknowledged criteria of measurement. It’s a chicken and egg trouble. The fundamental concept of the Hausman-Hill Collection is the tribute it pays to men and women who, by hand, developed some of the devices that challenged and eventually displaced humanity’s “handmade” epoch.

Cory Amsler, vice president of collections and interpretation at the Mercer Museum, hints at this paradox, writing, “The Mercer Museum is thrilled to current this gorgeous assemblage of early and typically uncommon measuring tools from a local Bucks County assortment. Jim Hill and Kathryn Hausman observe in the footsteps of Henry Mercer in appreciating the workmanship, scientific complexity and artistry involved in the manufacture of these impressive pre-industrial age instruments.

“‘Magnificent Actions! The Hausman-Hill Collection of Calculating Instruments’ involves devices for measuring the temperature (thermometers, barometers), land (surveying instruments), and the human physique (a tailor’s ruler and other implements for gauging the sizing of arms, legs, waists, ft, heads and fingers for crafting clothes and extras).

When Congress established a commission in the 1850s to conduct a survey of a portion of the northern boundary of the United States, a number of William Würdemann’s instruments were selected to accompany the survey team. The commission completed its work in the 1870s, which was summarized in a report authorized by President U.S. Grant. The Northern Boundary survey team carried and employed this actual instrument in its 1870s expedition. The device — numbered “71” by Würdemann — is specifically referenced in the commission’s 1877 report. Right, theodolite or geodesic transit #71 by William Würdemann, Washington DC, circa 1870. Brass, glass, wood. Photo Kevin Crawford Imagery LLC.

When Congress set up a commission in the 1850s to perform a survey of a portion of the northern boundary of the United States, a quantity of William Würdemann’s devices had been chosen to accompany the survey workforce. The fee done its do the job in the 1870s, which was summarized in a report authorized by President U.S. Grant. The Northern Boundary study team carried and utilized this actual instrument in its 1870s expedition. The device — numbered “71” by Würdemann — is specially referenced in the commission’s 1877 report. Correct, theodolite or geodesic transit #71 by William Würdemann, Washington DC, circa 1870. Brass, glass, wooden. Photo Kevin Crawford Imagery LLC.

“The show showcases the do the job of significant early makers of measuring implements, these as noteworthy Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century craftsmen Anthony Lamb, Rufus Porter, Thomas Greenough, Justus Roe, Caleb Leach and the Chapin Family members of Connecticut. Historic images and paperwork of these makers and their enterprises include to the exhibit’s appeal.”

The features of these equipment is past problem. You can see how well – and extensive – some of them observed services.

Further than perform lies the sheer natural beauty of these objects, as if they ended up made, not just with utility in thoughts, but with eye enchantment, curb appeal and an intent to express an knowledge of resources, how to condition them, blend them and build a thing new that could get some thing done and glance fantastic executing it.

Have a glimpse at the 1876 Mixture Measure fabricated by the Philadelphia organization Disston & Morss in honor of our nation’s centennial. An ingenious mix of retracting ruler and a protractor, the tool is created from stable brass and steel. What grabs the viewer is not the ingenuity of the point, it is the deep engraving together the sides of the Blend Evaluate. The scrollwork is exquisite, deeply incised bulbous acanthus curves and arabesques you would hope to obtain on the sideplates of the best double-barreled shotguns. The piece speaks to some thing deeply human, a trait that goes way back again in the archaeological file: the need to adorn even the most purposeful equipment and objects.

This is the earliest known mathematical instrument made in the American colonies. The unique instrument retains remarkable early repairs to its glass. The wood block-printed compass card is hand colored. Surveyor’s compass by Joseph Halsy, Boston, circa 1690. Wood, glass, paper.

This is the earliest identified mathematical instrument built in the American colonies. The exclusive instrument retains exceptional early repairs to its glass. The wood block-printed compass card is hand colored. Surveyor’s compass by Joseph Halsy, Boston, circa 1690. Wooden, glass, paper.

The moment you get started to recognize this, it’s almost everywhere in the exhibition. An Eighteenth Century Thomas Greenough surveyor’s compass, or circumferentor, retains the lovely patina of the wooden, but the brass object and eye vanes boast Chippendale curves and the compass confront by itself is decorated with a fleur-de-lis, sailing ships, a lighthouse and a flock of circling seagulls. The nautical decoration is curious considering that the surveyor’s compass is utilized to measure horizontal angles on land. By comparison, the Halsey compass, produced in 1690, is of less difficult style and design, but the compass rose in the centre of the deal with is an actual rose, elegantly drawn and printed. These decorations discuss to this period of exploration, assurance, and the optimism that humanity, by means of science, could begin to parse, map and exploit the means of the whole surface area of the Earth. For Indigenous Peoples the planet over, of system, these devices and the traces on paper that derived from them held small this means at initial but would come to have devastating consequences.

The perseverance of longitude is just one of the terrific tales in science. Dava Sobel’s reserve, Longitude, tells the tale wonderfully. As the require to build longitude became ever more urgent, the theodolite changed the surveyor’s compass. A historic instance of this instrument, Geodetic Transit #71 produced by William Würdemann in Washington DC circa 1870 is one particular of the highlights of the exhibition: “When Congress established a Fee in the 1850s to carry out a survey of a portion of the northern boundary of the United States, a selection of Würdemann’s devices have been selected to accompany the survey group. The Commission done its work in the 1870s, which was summarized in a report approved by President U.S. Grant. The Northern Boundary survey team carried and utilized this actual instrument in its 1870s expedition. The product – numbered ’71’ by Würdemann – is exclusively referenced in the Commission’s 1877 report.”

The gorgeous tableau of the two workmen that adorns the heart of the Rufus Porter inclinometer – labeled a “Plumb & Amount Indicator” – advertises alone, depicting a person employee lifting a board with a rod when the other watches a level, this degree in actuality. Not only does the graphic exhibit the Plumb & Level Indicator at perform, it shows the viewer an case in point of how the unit is to be utilized – the instrument is, in a way, its individual instruction guide. Now, in its have aged wooden body, this functioning object in the Hausman-Hill Selection gets to be a window into the earlier even as it transforms into a perform of artwork.

Originally patented by Franklin Bowly of Winchester, Va., this device was produced by the Chapin Company. The Ellipsograph was designed for drafting or laying out elliptical shapes. Ellipsograph by H. Chapin’s Son Co. (E.M. Chapin), Pine Meadow, Conn., 1868. Rosewood, boxwood, brass.

Initially patented by Franklin Bowly of Winchester, Va., this product was produced by the Chapin Corporation. The Ellipsograph was designed for drafting or laying out elliptical shapes. Ellipsograph by H. Chapin’s Son Co. (E.M. Chapin), Pine Meadow, Conn., 1868. Rosewood, boxwood, brass.

Other objects could possibly be much more humble yet they are nevertheless of excellent interest. For example, scales and curves that defy knowledge cover Studabecker’s Tailor’s Square. The teardrop form of the opening in the middle of the gadget seems to be ready to evaluate the neck and shoulder, and to area darts in a dress or robe.

In their fascinating ebook, The Culture of Diagram, authors John Bender and Michael Marrinan explain how used mathematics necessitates a cognitive leap correlating the abstraction of arithmetic with the forces, features and aspects of the real earth and delve into the paradigm change that starts in the Eighteenth Century with the arrival of calculus and the examine of probability. It wasn’t enough to see the entire world anew. Science had to have instruments to measure and ensure observations on scales huge and small. The realistic programs of these devices ushered in the Industrial Revolution and reworked the entire world. As we start out to assess the implications of that revolution, “Magnificent Steps! The Hausman-Hill Selection of Calculating Instruments” is a timely and significant exhibition.

I refer you back again to the Mars Local climate Orbiter disaster and leave you with a popular considered, 1 which is true whether or not you are sending a rocket into space, incorporating a deck to your house or hemming a skirt: evaluate two times minimize after. And when you measure, make guaranteed you measure with the suitable machine.

The Mercer Museum is at 84 South Pine Street. For more info, www.mercermuseum.org or 215-345-0210.

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